About this project and this person

MTB Comb

Who I am

Hello from Singapore. This survey started as part of my dissertation for an MSc in Environmental Policy. Before that I did Geography, and wrote a dissertation on ‘The place of wet markets in Singapore’ (12,000 words of woffle). Anyway enough about dissertations. back to top

C2C Comb

How I got cycling

When I was 18, a friend got me cycling on Sundays, on a road bike borrowed from another friend. Unfortunately I never enjoyed it because I didn’t adjust the bike properly, so my memories were ouch and ouch.

Then started university in the UK, and got a secondhand bike to go everywhere in daily life. Whenever I was home, I borrowed my cousin’s bike, and soon found that cyclists are bottom-class in transport – not allowed on pavements, not appreciated on roads.

Then moved to London, with the road bike which my friend very kindly gave me. Despite nasty traffic, ridiculous potholes and longer distances, I came to like cycling even more. back to top

Bike Comb

What and where I cycle

And I’m now very attached to that road bike, after some adjustments. It’s a 1992 Trek 2300 – an early carbon-aluminium frame. The crankset isn’t Biopace any more and the stem is no longer 26mm, but frame is still classic.

In London I got to school and work mostly by bike – the 9 km ride was great even in rush hour, since I could use the bus lane and there were some bike lanes. 

Apart from commuting I did some longer days out. My first multi-day ride was the Coast to Coast. That led to a few more, ending with a fundraising solo ride from Edinburgh to London.

In Singapore I rode to work for my first 2 years as I was lucky to have a bike- and shower-friendly office. Since then I’ve mainly ridden for recreation – yes, those early morning lycra wearing cyclists. back to top

Thames Comb

Why cycle and why this project

To me, nothing beats seeing the city at street level, at your own speed. Turn out of Vauxhall and suddenly your wheel’s in line with the London Eye. Cross Waterloo Bridge, the Whitehall skyline spreads left, the City skyline stretches right. And again at dusk, the river catches the sunset on one side, lights come to life on the other.

But I romanticise too much. In London, cycling was also about getting wet and cold and sweaty, lugging helmet waterproofs lights pannier D-lock bright jacket thick gloves, and dodging potholes and jaywalkers and cabs in the freezing dark (at 5pm in winter).

Singapore has good roads and no winter, two advantages already. It’s hot but if you’ll sweat anyway, might as well get some exercise at the same time. But you might not agree and that’s why this survey is here – to see if and how a cycling system could work. back to top

Equip Comb

5 Responses to “About”

  1. Ben Says:

    London (or Europe) roads has always been more pleasurable to cycle now with more courteous and more ‘competent’ motorists.

  2. JohnP Says:

    Hi, i would just like to say, what a cool blog! i am in the process of researching for my website but i had trouble reading this article due to the text protruding on to the menu…. edit… apologies, my fault, its my old version of opera causing the fault. Might be worthwhile asking peeps to update? Many thanks.

    1. zing Says:

      Hi John, your website looks interesting and a massive project – sure you can post a link on it and best of luck with it!

  3. Neil Says:

    Zing,

    I’m still in Singapore, (I never did get to speak F2F) but I was talking about your project to a someone who works for the NPB. They are working on round island bike route. She said she’d maybe like to get in touch with you to discuss your results.

    Can you PM me your new mail address?

    Thanks

    Neil

  4. lai50010 Says:

    Hey Tse Yin,

    I’m Andrew and i’m currently a JC 1 student this year doing a project on cycling as a green alternative for our project work topic. Our group was wondering if we could interview or have an online chat with you for your valuable advice.

    P.s. you can contact me at lai50010@yahoo.com.sg
    Cheers,
    Andrew.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s